Book review : Water Paper Paint

Water Paper Paint

I took watercolor class once in high school and once in college. I tried other kinds of paints like acrylic and gouache too and I think watercolor painting is the most difficult for me. The paint seems too hard to control and fix when I ruin something. Still, I love looking at watercolor paintings. They usually give out the feeling of sweet, lively happiness.
I found this book accidentally and was immediately drawn to the beautiful cover and inside layout. There are so many watercolor painting books in the market but most of them look like textbooks with busy layout design and I feel heavy looking at them.
This Water Paper Paint looks different. The book has such light and airy layout design with beautiful colored photos laid out carefully and cleverly throughout the book. The content is readable and practical too. The writer gradually walks you through each step from basic knowledge of the paint, its equipment, how to take care of them and all the different techniques. The main fun is all the projects the writer explains in step-by-step which seem so easy to follow along.
Although I’m more a digital painter, the book is so beautiful and inviting that I want to try some lessons in the book 🙂 This will be a valuable reference and good for inspiration for years to come too!
I have taken some shots of the lovely pages here. Enjoy!

Water Paper Paint

Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint
Water Paper Paint

Book Review: ‘Drawing your life’ by Michael Nobbs

As a member of Michael’s Sustainably Creative site, I am a huge fan of his gentle, funny and encouraging approach. This book is all of that in something you can carry round with you (perhaps in the portable studio Michael suggests). It contains lots of space for drawing (naturally), ideas for simple drawing missions based on everyday life – such as drawing your cup of tea – as well as some more unusual missions, like the portrait party. There are tips on how to draw, encouragement to not worry about getting things ‘right’, and also Michael’s ideas on including drawing in your life even when time and energy are short. If, like me, you were scarred by a critical art teacher at school, Michael’s approach will help you come back to drawing as fun. And through it, to appreciate the small things that you notice as you draw.

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To find out more about Michael and his book, click here and here.

Review written by Alison Clayton-Smith and first posted on www.amazon.co.uk

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